Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops
Albion's Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops

Albion’s Adela Wine Bar is stoking curiosity for experimental and unheralded drops

As Australia’s wine scene has expanded in diversity and scope, our drinking tastes have increased in complexity. More often are we seeking unconventional sips and experimental options. We hunt for vino from small-batch makers and growers that employ regenerative farming practices. Funky is no longer a frightening word, neither is natural (or sediment, for that matter). We crave a closer connection to the wine we drink, most often through hearing the stories behind each label. While it’s not always feasible to visit a winemaker in person, places like Adela Wine Bar in Albion not only make it easier to source curious wines, but also learn a bit more about them. The cosy wine bar is open now, with a 150-strong selection of bottles from an assortment of makers available alongside Euro-inspired food made with fine-dining flair.

For Silvana Calil, Adela Wine Bar is a door to winemakers. In an age where the intent behind a bottle of vino is as important as the liquid inside, Silvana is endeavouring to make accessing what she calls ‘curious wines’ – that is, unheralded small-batch drops that are terroir focused and often boast an unexpected, engrossing and slightly challenging quality – easier to obtain. The hospitality vet (who previously operated Spanish Tapas Bar on Brunswick Street in Fortitude Valley) is parlaying years of industry experience into her new wine haunt that, while diminutive in stature, manages to pack in a lot of substance. Located at the front of the Annabell’s of Albion building on Sandgate Road (next to Nutmeg Indian Cuisine), Adela Wine Bar is softly intimate and moody on the inside, with rendered walls, Brazilian stone counters, sheer curtains and, of course, shelves upon shelves of wine. Ensconced in Adela’s cosy confines – or, if preferred, seated in Adela’s street-facing outdoor patio – guests are free to leisurely explore the lengthy and broad-reaching list of wines.

If Adela Wine Bar has a goal, it’s to educate guests on the magic behind each wine it stocks. Silvana, eager to share the stories of the growers and producers she’s engaged with, is going to great lengths to relay the who, when and why of everything listed on the beverage list. Though Silvana is the driving force behind the menu construction, she’s also recruited the input of esteemed oenophile and certified Master of Wine Peter Scudamore-Smith to collaborate on the range, guiding food pairings and seasonal additions. The bar stocks a 150-strong collection of bottles, with 30 rotating options available by the glass. Though timeless options are available, Silvana relishes being able to shine a spotlight on some under-appreciated gems, be it intriguing wines from our own backyard like Ballandean Estate’s saperavi, flinty single-vineyard chardonnay from Usher Tinkler, zippy amphora-fermented skin-contact semillon from White Gate Wine Co., and amber-hued skin-contact whites from Whistler Wines, among many others. Silvana’s curated approach extends beyond wine to other potables, with a BK Wines cidre and Travis Fimmel (of Vikings fame) and chef Andy Allen’s crisp Travla lager also available. A short cocktail list features a range of classic sips and signature concoctions (the latter inspired by Silvana’s own stories) ranging from the Adela: A Noble Affair (Japanese gin, toasted coconut, sake, lychee liqueur and lime juice) to the Baby in Rose (mezcal, dry vermouth, lime juice, agave).

Though positioned as a wine bar first and foremost, Adela’s menu is well worth investigating in its own right. In the kitchen, talented young chef Kohel Mintz is crafting a killer offering informed by his experience working in Michelin-starred kitchens. The Canadian chef, whose resume features stints at Têtedoie in Lyon and Le Gavroche in London (as well as a private chef for high-profile celebrities in the Caribbean), is putting his experience in fine-dining kitchens towards a European-inspired menu. Seasonality plays a key role here, with Kohel implementing sweeping changes twice per season to ensure he’s catching the best produce from the early and latter half of each cycle. Created to complement and designed to be shared, the menu starts with cheeses (including Australian scamorza, French roquefort and Spanish manchego) and charcuterie (wagyu bresaola, cantimpalo and pistachio salami) before segueing into small and large plates. Of the smaller portions, highlights include rockmelon gazpacho with pomegranate, almond and croutons, charred beetroot with fetta, strawberry and lemon thyme, and corn ribs with parmesan and cilantro butter. Bigger portions like cod croquettes with aioli and lemon, lamb presse with romesco, carrot and pickles, seared barramundi with sofrito, coconut and rice, and Adela’s patatas with capsicum and bravas sauce also showcase Kohel’s penchant for crafting flavour-packed sauces and accompaniments.

Adela Wine Bar is now open to the public from Wednesday to Sunday. For operating hours and contact details, head to the Stumble Guide

The Stumble Guide is our comprehensive Brisbane dining guide with more than 2400 places to eat, drink, shop and play.

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