Five hidden gems across Brisbane every interior-design lover should know
Five hidden gems across Brisbane every interior-design lover should know
Five hidden gems across Brisbane every interior-design lover should know
Five hidden gems across Brisbane every interior-design lover should know
Five hidden gems across Brisbane every interior-design lover should know

Five hidden gems across Brisbane every interior-design lover should know

In the last few years, the Brisbane food scene has spread far beyond the inner-city. From the bayside haunt of Wynnum to the urban enclave of Milton, you’ll find supremely chic cafes and restaurants scattered across Brisbane suburbs. We’ve rounded up the five hidden gem venues every design lover should know that are serving up delicious interiors in unlikely places.

Beurre, Milton: Nestled in the corner-facing complex of 33 Park Road, Beurre is a bakery-buff haven. While the concept fuses traditional-French patisserie with minimalist-Japanese design, butter was the muse for more than just the menu. The interior boasts a mesmerising curved ceiling, inspired by butter’s soft flow that’s paired with cream-tiled walls and paired with a border detail of dark stones (akin to a Japanese ​​Karesansui). With a showroom-style look, the bakery is punctuated by an impressive sable-toned marble bench which showcases Beurre’s tight menu of pastries. A secluded garden sits adjacent to the striking monochromatic space, offering patrons somewhere to sample their treats.

Adelita, Wynnum: Positioned just a stone’s throw from the bay, Adelita brings a uniquely cosmopolitan aesthetic to Wynnum. The considered design of curved lines and muted colours has elevated this neighbourhood wine bar into a hotspot that’s turning heads across the city. Rich in emerald green and timber tones, Adelita has taken inspiration from its lush parkland surroundings as well as classic European wine bars. The Italian mosaic floors are balanced with the bar’s copper accents and black furnishings. A lavish U-shaped island bar forms the space’s centre piece, topped with Verde Alpi marble and illuminated by pendant lights. Designed with the vision of becoming  “the hidden gem by the bay”, Adelita has fused casual dining with a metropolitan elegance.

Dicki’s, Ascot: The plant-based eatery is best known for its new-wave vegan cuisine that extends far beyond tofu and soy milk. Dicki’s Cafe has balanced its newfangled culinary techniques with a minimalist interior, akin to the simplicity of Ascot’s classic Queenslander homes. You’ll find Dicki’s refreshed vegan ethos imbued in the space’s subtle use of clean and green colourways. The design – a collaboration between Pagewood Projects and Clui Design – is led by the likes of polished-concrete floors and blonde-timber furnishings. Both of which are enhanced by the plentitude of glass windows, left open for service. With a corner location at the end of Ascot’s high street, Dicki’s Cafe was envisioned to be a friendly haunt that welcomes both omnivores and carnivores.

Fosh, Hamilton: The seafood restaurant and its sibling fish and chippery sits hidden in Portside Wharf. Through the use of a river-facing entrance, Fosh immerses its guests in the waterside location and locale. Fosh’s contemporary Hamptons-style interior embraces the Hamilton scene with the likes of cream-coloured cushions, almond-toned tiles and pale timbers. The light-filled oasis, designed in collaboration with Kyson Commercial, is finished with hints of coastal charm, including pops of royal blue and fish-focused artwork. Along the boardwalk, its semi-alfresco dining space is surrounded by potted plants and backdropped by Fosh’s island bar and seafood display. The restaurant offers a peaceful and sophisticated spot to unwind for long lunches and milestone dinners.

Monal Dining, Newstead: Whilst the Gasworks area tends to be best known for its Gasometer dining hub, the newly developed strip on Skyring Terrace has seen a suite of new openings including Monal Dining. The neighbourhood bistro is spearheaded by young-gun chef, Yogesh Budathoki, pairing his fusion-style menu with a modernist design by Clui Design and Lowry Group. Decked in warm-timber panelling, leather banquette seating and a scattering of bentwood chairs, the local haunt walks the fine line between bar and restaurant with ease. The small compact space is bannered by a simple sign located adjacent to the door to capture a in-the-know feel.

This article was written in partnership with our friends at Clui Design. 

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