Indigenous art exhibition My Country, I Still Call Australia Home opens at GOMA

The fragmented relationship between the non-indigenous and indigenous population of the land girt by sea is a well-documented subject, but one that remains contentious. It’s the controversy of interracial relationships that has inspired the latest exhibition to reach GOMA, My Country, I Still Call Australia Home: Contemporary Art from Black Australia.

Not only is the collection of works an investigation of topics that still remain somewhat taboo but also a milestone for GOMA itself – My Country, I Still Call Australia Home is the largest exhibition of contemporary art by Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islander artists to be shown at GOMA. More than 300 pieces of art by 115 artists are included in the collection, with representatives from each of Australia’s states and territories. Just some of the notable artists whose works will be included in the exhibition are Vernon Ah Kee, Christopher Pease, Judy Watson, Archie Moore, Richard Bell, Destiny Deacon, Bindi Cole and Doreen Reid Nakamarra.

A range of mediums are included in the exhibition, ranging from photographs and film to installations, painting and sculpture. The works are grouped to represent three specific subjects: indigenous views of history, contemporary politics and experiences, and the illustration of connection to place.

My Country, I Still Call Australia Home will be available to peruse at GOMA from June 1 to October 7. There will also be an opening party held on June 1 as a one-day-only event to celebrate the exhibition’s arrival. The day’s festivities will include free talks and discussions, along with live evening performances from Archie Roach, The Medics and Bunna Lawrie of Coloured Stone.

Image credit

Christian Thompson / Black Gum 2 (from ‘Australian Graffiti’ series) 2008 / Type C photograph

 

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